Photo Page 5 - Iran's Ancient Site at Persepolis

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Here are Some of the Marvelous Sculptings That Have Survived Through Time:

Seven Images of Sculptings and Relief Carvings at the Ruins of the Great Palace at Persepolis, Iran.

A Magnificient Sculpting Sits Alone.

This piece of stone art work, is no rough carving made by a primitive people, but a magnificient work made by a great people of a civilization that has long been swept away by the fierce ravages of time's passing.

This is one of my favorite images of one of Persepolis's mythical creatures.

I updated and digitally restored this image to its original completness to use as the heading image of chapter twenty in my book "Blood Flower", a historical fiction novel, whose story takes place in Central Iran from 1975 to the time of Iran's Islamic Revolution. (See the "Book Images" page.)

Another of Persepolis's Beautiful Stone Sculptings

In the detail of this sculpting depicting a great bull, even the blood vessel in the animal's head is clearly shown.

Here is part of the remainder of the Palaces of Persia's Achaemenian Kings.

Modern Iranians, some of whom are unmindful of history's past, wrongly call Persepolis by the name "Takht-i-Jamshid" (The Throne of Jamshid) ascribing this site to a popular hero, who neither had, or has, anything to do with this site or its origin.

One of the two Triumphful Stairways which lead to the Palace's Upper Platform.

To carry here and place such great blocks of stone as those that make up this palace site, was a monumental task, which would have been most difficult even with the mechaniams of today's world.

This is one of the favorite images from part of the triumphal Stairway.

Translated writings from Persepolis have Darius the Great, boasting that by the grace of Ahuramazada, he built this fortress, on the place where no fotress had ever stood before. The site was further constructed by his son Xerxes and later by Artaxerxes. The site was burned to the ground by the army of Alexander the Great during the time of the last Darius.

Part of the base of the Great Palace's Platform.

The enormous platform on which the ruined halls and palaces stand is built straight out from the foot of the hills which rise up behind it. The platform is 1523 feet from north to south and its breadth is 920 feet east to west. It was built with blocks of limestone, some of which are fifty feet long and ten feet wide.